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Wodonga Council leads sustainability charge

­­Wodonga Council is leading the sustainability charge with two grants awarded recently to help Victorian councils become more environmentally sustainable and to save money across municipal borders.­­

The grants aim to improve sustainability and collaboration among Victorian councils to be more efficient, for example by purchasing power jointly or sharing resources.

One grant of $70,000 has been allocated to Wodonga Council (in partnership with Indigo Shire) to audit the energy efficiency of council-owned buildings to save greenhouse gas emissions, and reduce operating costs.

A second grant of $65,000 will fund a feasibility study to define best-practice environmentally sustainable design for residential subdivisions. It aims to achieve more climate resilient neighbourhoods and help landowners to improve the environmental sustainability of homes.

Awarded to Wodonga in partnership with seven other regional councils (Ballarat, Baw Baw, Greater Bendigo, Greater Geelong, Greater­­ Shepparton, Moorabool and Wangaratta), this grant will find the best approach for regional Victoria to improve new homes’ energy and water efficiency, rather than retrofitting later and often at more expense.

“Wodonga Council is thrilled to lead this project to develop best practice environmentally sustainable design at the very early stages of building homes, that is, when land is subdivided,” Wodonga Council CEO Patience Harrington said.

“By incorporating simple things such as orienting living areas to face north and using awnings and landscaping, we can help homeowners save money in the long run through lower energy bills.”

As well as financial benefits, environment benefits include lower greenhouse gas emissions, more shade to reduce the urban ‘heat island’ effect (cooling the streets to adapt to rising temperatures), and increased water efficiency by using recycled water for gardens and open spaces.

There are also social and health benefits, such as more shaded and walkable streets, open spaces and community gardens.

This grant will also fund a cost benefit analysis to ensure environmentally sustainable design principles promote housing affordability in the long term.

“We hope to educate homeowners that by choosing the right materials and the best design, their homes will definitely be more comfortable to live in, and cheaper to heat and cool," Ms Harrington said.

The grants were awarded under the Victorian Government’s third round of the Collaborative Council Sustainability Fund Partnership Program.

­­Media release: Friday, July 7, 2017

Wodonga Council leads sustainability charge

Wodonga Council is leading the sustainability charge with two grants awarded recently to help Victorian councils become more environmentally sustainable and to save money across municipal borders.­­

The grants aim to improve sustainability and collaboration among Victorian councils to be more efficient, for example by purchasing power jointly or sharing resources.

One grant of $70,000 has been allocated to Wodonga Council (in partnership with Indigo Shire) to audit the energy efficiency of council-owned buildings to save greenhouse gas emissions, and reduce operating costs.

A second grant of $65,000 will fund a feasibility study to define best-practice environmentally sustainable design for residential subdivisions. It aims to achieve more climate resilient neighbourhoods and help landowners to improve the environmental sustainability of homes.

Awarded to Wodonga in partnership with seven other regional councils (Ballarat, Baw Baw, Greater Bendigo, Greater Geelong, Greater­­ Shepparton, Moorabool and Wangaratta), this grant will find the best approach for regional Victoria to improve new homes’ energy and water efficiency, rather than retrofitting later and often at more expense.

“Wodonga Council is thrilled to lead this project to develop best practice environmentally sustainable design at the very early stages of building homes, that is, when land is subdivided,” Wodonga Council CEO Patience Harrington said.

“By incorporating simple things such as orienting living areas to face north and using awnings and landscaping, we can help homeowners save money in the long run through lower energy bills.”

As well as financial benefits, environment benefits include lower greenhouse gas emissions, more shade to reduce the urban ‘heat island’ effect (cooling the streets to adapt to rising temperatures), and increased water efficiency by using recycled water for gardens and open spaces.

There are also social and health benefits, such as more shaded and walkable streets, open spaces and community gardens.

This grant will also fund a cost benefit analysis to ensure environmentally sustainable design principles promote housing affordability in the long term.

“We hope to educate homeowners that by choosing the right materials and the best design, their homes will definitely be more comfortable to live in, and cheaper to heat and cool, Ms Harrington said.

The grants were awarded under the Victorian Government’s third round of the Collaborative Council Sustainability Fund Partnership Program.

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Last updated: 07-07-2017

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